Author Archives: InThePastLane

About InThePastLane

Dr. Edward T. O’Donnell is a professional historian, author, and speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in American History from Columbia University. He is an Associate Professor of History at Holy Cross College in Worcester, MA. Learn more at www.EdwardTODonnell.com He is the author of several books, including (as co-author) the new U.S. History college-level textbook, Visions of America: A History of the United States, 2nd edition (Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2012), Ship Ablaze: The Tragedy of the Steamboat General Slocum (Random House, 2003) and the forthcoming Talisman of a Lost Hope: Henry George, American Workers, and the Republican Crisis of the Gilded Age (Columbia University Press, 2013). His scholarly articles have appeared in the Public Historian, Journal of Urban History, and the Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. O’Donnell is also active in the field of public history. He has curated several major museum exhibits on American history and appeared in several historical documentaries. He has provided historical insight and commentary for PBS, the History Channel, the Discovery Channel, and National Public Radio. Since 2002 O’Donnell has made hundreds of teacher professional development presentations, including content lectures, pedagogy workshops, and walking tours, for the Teaching American History program in 26 states, including New York, Massachusetts, Maine, Michigan, Virginia, Florida, California, Wyoming, Iowa, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin. Learn more at www.EdwardTODonnell.com or follow him on Twitter at @InThePastLane

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Mercy Street Rewind with Megan Kate Nelson – We Review Each Episode from Season 2

subscribe-buttonMercy Street Rewind is a special feature of In the Past Lane, the podcast about history and why it matters. Historian Megan Kate Nelson (Senior Civil War Correspondent for ITPL) sits down with Edward T. O’Donnell (Historian-at-Large and host of ITPL) to break down each episode of the PBS historical drama, “Mercy Street.” We offer insightful and often humorous analysis of the show, its characters, and the stories it tells — all from the perspective of historians, with Megan’s sharp cultural critic analysis as an added plus. Spoiler alert: we recommend you watch each episode before listening to our take.
Scroll down to find each episode. [Looking for Season 1 episodes? Click here]

Mercy Street Rewind, Season 2 Extra – a conversation with co-creator David Zabel

Mercy Street Rewind, Season 2, Episode 1: “A Balm in Gilead”

Mercy Street Rewind, Season 2, Episode 2: “The House Guest”

Mercy Street Rewind, Season 2, Episode 3: “One Equal Temper”

Mercy Street Rewind, Season 2, Episode 4: “Southern Mercy”

Mercy Street Rewind, Season 2, Episode 5: “Unknown Soldier”

Mercy Street Rewind, Season 2, Episode 6: “House of Bondage”

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Episode 20 African American Soldiers in the Civil War


In this episode of ITPL, we focus on the experiences of African Americans who joined the Union Army during the Civil War and the profound impact they had on the war’s final outcome — and on American society in the decades that followed. There’s a lot more to this story than what you may have seen in the award-winning film, “Glory” (1989). So here’s the lineup:
1. First, I provide a brief backgrounder on the basic details regarding African Americans and their service in the Union Army and Navy.
2. Second, I sit down with historian Douglas Egerton to talk about his new book, Thunder at the Gates: The Black Civil War Regiments That Redeemed America (Basic Books, 2016).
3. Finally, I present a feature on the Ft. Pillow Massacre, perhaps the grimmest incident in the whole Civil War.
In The Past Lane is a production of Snoring Beagle International, Ltd.

Show notes for this episode

More About Douglas Egertonitpl-020-egerton-book-cover

His faculty page at LeMoyne College

Further Reading and Links

Douglas Egerton, Thunder at the Gates: The Black Civil War Regiments That Redeemed America (Basic Books, 2016)

Martin H. Blatt, ed., et al, Hope & Glory: Essays on the Legacy of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment (2000)

James Henry Gooding, On the Altar of Freedom: A Black Soldier’s Civil War Letters from the Front

James M. McPherson, The Negro’s Civil War: How American Blacks Felt and Acted During the War for the Union

Episode Credits

Music

Jay Graham, ITPL Intro (courtesy, JayGMusic.com)

Kevin McCleod, “Impact Moderato” (Free Music Archive)

Kevin McLeod, Impact Moderato (Free Music Archive)

Andy Cohen, “Bathed in Fine Dust” (Free Music Archive)

Ketsa, “Escape the Profane” (Free Music Archive)

Jason Shaw, “Acoustic Meditation” (Free Music Archive)

Cuicuitte, “Vivan” and “Sultan Cintre” (Free Music Archive)

Dana Boule, “We All Need to Calm Down” (Free Music Archive)

The Bell, “I Am History” (Free Music Archive)

Hyson, “Signals” (Free Music Archive)

The Bell, “I Am History” (Free Music Archive)

Production

Technical Advisors: Holly Hunt and Jesse Anderson

Podcasting Consultant: Darrell Darnell of Pro Podcast Solutions

Photographer: John Buckingham

Graphic Designer: Maggie Cellucci

Website by: ERI Design

Legal services: Tippecanoe and Tyler Too

Social Media management: the Pony Express

Risk Assessment: Little Big Horn associates

Growth strategies: 54 40 or Fight

Snoring Beagle International, Ltd

 

 

Mercy Street Rewind - MansionHouse_LOC - title card

Mercy Street Rewind with Megan Kate Nelson – We Review Each Episode from Season 1

subscribe-buttonMercy Street Rewind is a special feature of In the Past Lane, the podcast about history and why it matters. Historian Megan Kate Nelson (Senior Civil War Correspondent for ITPL) sits down with Edward T. O’Donnell (Historian-at-Large and host of ITPL) to break down each episode of the PBS historical drama, “Mercy Street.” We offer insightful and often humorous analysis of the show, its characters, and the stories it tells — all from the perspective of historians, with Megan’s sharp cultural critic analysis as an added plus. Spoiler alert: we recommend you watch each episode before listening to our take.
Scroll down to find each episode. [Looking for Season 2 episodes? Click here]

Mercy Street Rewind Season 1, Episode 1

Mercy Street Rewind Season 1, Episode 2

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Mercy Street Rewind Season 1, Episode 3

Mercy Street Rewind Season 1, Episode 4

Mercy Street Rewind Season 1, Episode 5

Mercy Street Rewind Season 1, Episode 6

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Episode 019 The Hidden History of Indian Slavery in America


This week at ITPL, I speak with historian Andres Resendez about his new book, The Other Slavery: The Uncovered History of Indian Slavery in America. The enslaving of native peoples in the Americas began the moment Christopher Columbus arrived. And it was no smasubscribe-buttonll venture. Some 2.5 – 5 million Indians were enslaved (compared to approximately 12 million Africans). In my interview with Professor Resendez, he explains how and why this system of exploitation started and why it somehow remained hidden, both at the time and later in the historical record. This recovery of the story of Indian slavery has major implications for the understanding of not just the history of American slavery, but for all of American history.

More about Andres Resendez:
http://history.ucdavis.edu/people/resendezep-019-resendez-other-slavery-cover-image-copy

This and That
The PBS documentary about Pearl Harbor I’m featured in:  Pearl Harbor: The USS Oklahoma: The Final Story

Further Reading:

Andres Resendez, The Other Slavery: The Uncovered History of Indian Slavery in America

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States

Brendan C. Lindsay, Murder State: California’s Native American Genocide, 1846-1873

Benjamin Madley, An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846-1873

David E. Stannard, American Holocaust: The Conquest of the New World

Music

Jay Graham, ITPL Intro (courtesy, JayGMusic.com)

Kevin McCleod, “Impact Moderato” (Free Music Archive)

Lee Rosevere, “Going Home” (Free Music Archive)

The Bell, “On The Street” (Free Music Archive)

Jason Shaw, “River Meditation” (Free Music Archive)

The Bell, “I Am History” (Free Music Archive)

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Episode 018 The Rise of Conservative Media in the US

This week at In The Past Lane, we talk to historian Nicole Hemmer about her new book, Messengers of the Right: Conservative Media and the Transformation of American Politics (Penn Press, 2016). Hemmer, who also co-hosts the terrific history podcast, Past Present, provides a fascinating look into the 30 years of American political history beforsubscribe-buttone the election of Ronald Reagan in 1980. We learn that long, long before the rise of Rush Limbaugh (1988) and FoxNews (1996), conservative “media activists” were hard at work establishing magazines, radio and TV programs, and other forms of media and institutions to promote the modern conservative movement. Given this crazy election season, with the many questions it’s raised about the state of the Republican Party, the conservative movement, and key conservative media outlets like Fox News, this is a remarkably well-timed book. Join Nicole Hemmer and me for a lively and informative conversation.

hemmer-book-cover-copyMore about Nicole Hemmer
Twitter @PastPresentPod
Past Present Podcast
http://www.pastpresentpodcast.com/
US News column: http://www.usnews.com/topics/author/nicole_hemmer
Book: Messengers of the Right: Conservative Media and the Transformation of American Politics (Penn Press, 2016)

Further Reading

Nicole Hemmer, Messengers of the Right: Conservative Media and the Transformation of American Politics (Penn Press, 2016)