Tag Archives: #Twitterstorians

Vietnam War veteran Len Brooks, from New Jersey, places his hands on names on the Wall That Heals, which is a half-scale replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. and is on display on the LBJ Presidential Library plaza everyday of the  Vietnam War Summit at the LBJ Presidential Library on the University of Texas at Austin campus. 
RALPH BARRERA/AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Episode 039 Ken Burns and Coming to Terms with The Vietnam War


This week I speak with America’s most acclaimed documentary filmmaker, Ken Burns, about his new project, The Vietnam War. This 10-part, 18-hour epic debuts on PBS on September 17, 2017. Vietnam has long been one of the most divisive events in recent US history. And yet, after making films on the two most popular wars in US history, the Civil War and World War II, Ken Burns has taken on this extraordinarily complicated and emotion-filled topic. It’s sure to generate a lot of commentary and — as he and I discuss in this interview — hopefully, many conversations in homes across the US. This episode begins with a short set-up piece, kind of a Vietnam 101, and then moves on to the main event, my interview with Ken Burns. I hope you enjoy listening as much as I did.

Among the many things discussed in this episode:

Why Ken Burns chose to tackle the Vietnam War.

Why Americans initially supported the Vietnam War.

What eventually made the Vietnam War so controversial.

Why Ken Burns thinks his film has the potential to bring a divided America together.

How the Vietnam Wall went from controversy to sacred space.

About Ken Burns – website

Further Reading

Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns, The Vietnam War: An Intimate History (2017)

David Halberstam, The Best and the Brightest (1972)

Stanley Karnow, Vietnam: A History (1991)

Neil Sheehan, A Bright Shining Lie: John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam (1989)

Smithsonian, The Vietnam War: The Definitive Illustrated History (2017)

Karen Gottschang Turner, Even the Women Must Fight: Memories of War from North Vietnam (1998)

Music for This Episode

Jay Graham, ITPL Intro (JayGMusic.com)

Kevin McCleod, “Impact Moderato” (Free Music Archive)

Hefferman, “Discovery” (Free Music Archive)

Blue Dot Sessions, “Sage the Hunter” (Free Music Archive)

Hefferman, “Winter’s Trek” (Free Music Archive)

The Bell, “I Am History” (Free Music Archive)

Production Credits

Executive Producer: Lulu Spencer

Technical Advisors: Holly Hunt and Jesse Anderson

Podcasting Consultant: Darrell Darnell of Pro Podcast Solutions

Photographer: John Buckingham

Graphic Designer: Maggie Cellucci

Website by: ERI Design

Legal services: Tippecanoe and Tyler Too

Social Media management: The Pony Express

Risk Assessment: Little Big Horn Associates

Growth strategies: 54 40 or Fight

© Snoring Beagle International, 2017

ITPL Ep 038 featured image

Episode 038 Classroom Wars! The History Behind the Fights over Bilingual Ed and Sex Ed in US Public Schools


It’s September, so this history podcast is rolling out its annual back-to-school episode. This go around, we address the question: What do the controversies in the 1960s and 1970s surrounding sex education and bilingual education have to do with each other? Well, quite a bit, as it turns out. And that’s why I’ll sit down with historian Natalia Petrzela to talk about her book, Classroom Wars: Language, Sex, and the Making of Modern Political Culture (Oxford University Press). It’s a fascinating examination of the history of education policy and how it both reflected and shaped political discourse about immigration and diversity, as well as attitudes about sex and sexual mores, in the mid-20th century. We also talk about Natalia’s role as a co-host of another fabulous history podcast, Past Present (http://www.pastpresentpodcast.com).

Among the many things discussed in this episode:

How political conservatives in the 1960s advocated bilingual education and cultural exchange with Mexico.

Why bilingual education became more controversial, in part, due to increased political activism by Latino rights groups like La Raza.

How efforts to promote bilingual education also led to increased acceptance of Latino culture and diversity in public schools.

How and why sex education became politicized in the 1960s.

How some conservatives in the 1960s linked sex education to promoting communism.

Why, despite great opposition, both sex education and bilingual education gained wide acceptance by the 1980s.

What Natalia Petrzela enjoys most about co-hosting the Past Present podcast.

About Natalia Petrzela
website
Twitter @NataliaPetrzela

Further Reading

petrzela book coverNatalia Petrzela, Classroom Wars: Language, Sex, and the Making of Modern Political Culture (2016).

Carlos Kevin Blanton, The Strange Career of Bilingual Education in Texas, 1836-1981 (2007).

Jessica Fields, Risky Lessons: Sex Education and Social Inequality (2008).

Janice M. Irvine, Talk About Sex: The Battles over Sex Education in the United States (2004).

Adam Laats, The Other School Reformers: Conservative Activism in American Education (2015).

Guadalupe San Miguel Jr., Contested Policy: The Rise and Fall of Federal Bilingual Education in the United States, 1960-2001 (2004).

Music for This Episode

Jay Graham, ITPL Intro (JayGMusic.com)

Kevin McCleod, “Impact Moderato” (Free Music Archive)

Lee Rosevere, “Going Home” (Free Music Archive)

Hefferman, “Winter Trek” (Free Music Archive)

The Bell, “I Am History” (Free Music Archive)

Production Credits

Executive Producer: Lulu Spencer

Technical Advisors: Holly Hunt and Jesse Anderson

Podcasting Consultant: Darrell Darnell of Pro Podcast Solutions

Photographer: John Buckingham

Graphic Designer: Maggie Cellucci

Website by: ERI Design

Legal services: Tippecanoe and Tyler Too

Social Media management: The Pony Express

Risk Assessment: Little Big Horn Associates

Growth strategies: 54 40 or Fight

© Snoring Beagle International, 2017

History Unfolded US Newspapers and the Holocaust

Episode 037 The History Unfolded Project and What Americans Knew About The Holocaust


This week at In The Past Lane, the history podcast, we respond to the virulent anti-semitism that was on display during the neo-Nazi and white supremacist march in Charlottesville,VA by bringing to you an episode about a remarkable history research project. It’s called, History Unfolded: US Newspapers and the Holocaust, and it’s bringing to light thousands of articles that appeared in US newspapers between 1933 and 1945 that told American readers in vivid detail about the Nazi campaign to persecute and exterminate millions of Jews in Europe. And here’s a truly remarkable feature of this project — anyone can participate as a researcher – including you, or your students, if you’re a teacher. So give a listen to my conversation with Elissa Frankle of History Unfolded and learn how this new digital research initiative is changing the way we understand the American response to the Holocaust.

Website: History Unfolded: US Newspapers and the Holocaust

Further Reading

Robert H. Abzug, America Views the Holocaust, 1933-45 : A Brief Documentary History (1999)

Michael Berenbaum, The World Must Know: The History of the Holocaust as Told in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (2006).

Leonard Dinnerstein, Antisemitism in America (1995)

Henry Feingold, Bearing Witness: Holocaust: How America and Its Jews Responded to the Holocaust (1995).

Deborah E. Lipstadt, Beyond Belief: The American Press And The Coming Of The Holocaust, 1933- 1945 (1993).

Christopher Mathias, “All The Swastikas And Broken Glass Since Charlottesville,” HuffPo August 25, 2017.

Arthur D. Morse, While Six Million Died: A Chronicle of American Apathy (1998)

David S. Wyman, The Abandonment of the Jews: America and the Holocaust 1941-1945 (2007)

Music for This Episode

Jay Graham, ITPL Intro (JayGMusic.com)

Kevin McCleod, “Impact Moderato” (Free Music Archive)

Ketsa, “Follow the Course” (Free Music Archive)

Hefferman, “Epoch” (Free Music Archive)

Hefferman, “Winter Trek” (Free Music Archive)

The Bell, “I Am History” (Free Music Archive)

Production Credits

Executive Producer: Lulu Spencer

Technical Advisors: Holly Hunt and Jesse Anderson

Podcasting Consultant: Darrell Darnell of Pro Podcast Solutions

Photographer: John Buckingham

Graphic Designer: Maggie Cellucci

Website by: ERI Design

Legal services: Tippecanoe and Tyler Too

Social Media management: The Pony Express

Risk Assessment: Little Big Horn Associates

Growth strategies: 54 40 or Fight

© Snoring Beagle International, 2017

ITPL Ep 036 featured image

Episode 036 Libertarianism in US History


This week we take on the topic of libertarianism, an ideology that in recent years has gained many adherents, including political conservatives and people in business, especially the high tech industry. But it’s worth asking, what is libertarianism and where does it fit in the history of American political culture? Is it a mainstream ideology with deep roots in American history? Or is it one on the fringe? And what accounts for its surging popularity in recent years?
Well, to answer these questions, I’ll first give my historian’s take on libertarianism. Spoiler alert: I’m not a big fan. I’ll point out how libertarianism occupies a place on the very outer fringe of American political ideology. And that it’s mainly an ideology of recent origin (ca 1945) and that it’s popularity has a lot to do with the efforts of millionaires and billionaires, as well as large corporations, that fund pro-libertarian initiatives. The US has always revered individualism, but not the radical individualism that defines libertarianism. It’s an individualism that has always been tempered by an equally important commitment to the common good.
ITPL Ep 036 Woodside book cover
Then I’ll speak with Christine Woodside, author of the book, Libertarians on the Prairie: Laura Ingalls Wilder, Rose Wilder Lane, and the Making of the Little House Books. Wait, what? Little House on the Prairie has something to do with libertarianism? Yes. In fact, as you’re about to hear, it has quite a bit to do with it. Let’s just say that it’s a story that includes not only Laura Ingalls Wilder, but also Ayn Rand, the Koch brothers, and the Libertarian Party.

Among the many things discussed in this episode:
What is libertarianism and where does it fit in the history of American political culture?

How have billionaires and corporations since 1945 worked to promote libertarianism?

Why the Founding Fathers were NOT libertarians.

How Laura Ingalls Wilder and her daughter infused libertarian themes into the Little House books.

How the Little House on the Prairie franchise helped fund the rise of libertarianism and the Libertarian Party in the mid-20th century.

About Christine Woodside – website

Further Reading

Christine Woodside, Libertarians on the Prairie: Laura Ingalls Wilder, Rose Wilder Lane, and the Making of the Little House Books (2015)

Nancy MacLean, Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America (2017)

Colin Woodard, American Character: A History of the Epic Struggle Between Individual Liberty and the Common Good (2015)

Daniel Cluchey, “The Founding Fathers Were Not Libertarians,” Huffington Post, May 25, 2011

Music for This Episode

Jay Graham, ITPL Intro (JayGMusic.com)

Kevin McCleod, “Impact Moderato” (Free Music Archive)

Ketsa, “I Will Be There” (Free Music Archive)

Doc Turtle, “Thought Soup” (Free Music Archive)

Hefferman, “Winter Trek” (Free Music Archive)

The Bell, “I Am History” (Free Music Archive)

Production Credits

Executive Producer: Lulu Spencer

Technical Advisors: Holly Hunt and Jesse Anderson

Podcasting Consultant: Darrell Darnell of Pro Podcast Solutions

Photographer: John Buckingham

Graphic Designer: Maggie Cellucci

Website by: ERI Design

Legal services: Tippecanoe and Tyler Too

Social Media management: The Pony Express

Risk Assessment: Little Big Horn Associates

Growth strategies: 54 40 or Fight

© Snoring Beagle International, 2017

ITPL Ep 035 featured image

Episode 035 Albert Cashier, Transgender Soldier in the American Civil War


President Trump’s announcement via Twitter that transgender personnel would no longer be allowed to serve in the US armed forces provides an excellent opportunity to take a look at the history of female and trans soldiers who have fought in past US wars. Most people would be surprised to learn that there are over 100 documented cases of women who served in the Confederate and Union armies during the Civil War. In this episode, we look at the story of Albert Cashier, possibly the best known transgender soldier in US history who served in the Union Army during the Civil War. It’s a remarkable story that provides us with some important historical perspective on the current #TransBan debate.

Albert Cashier, in his Union Army uniform

Among the many things we discuss:

Who was Albert Cashier?

How did he manage to serve in the Union Army for 3 years without anyone suspecting that he was born in Ireland with the name Jenny Hodgers.

How Cashier maintained his male identity for more than 40 years, only to have his “secret” discovered near the end of his life.

How when word got out about Cashier’s birth identity, the U.S. Pension Bureau considered revoking his pension, but opted to maintain it when they determined that Hodgers and Cashier were one in the same.

Further Reading

De Anne Blanton and Lauren M. Cook, They Fought Like Demons: Women Soldiers in the Civil War (2003).

Lon Dawson, Also Known as Albert D. J. Cashier: The Jennie Hodgers Story, or How One Young Irish Girl Joined the Union Army During the Civil War (2005)

Bonnie Tsui, She Went to the Field: Women Soldiers of the Civil War (2003)

Music for This Episode

Jay Graham, ITPL Intro (JayGMusic.com)

Kevin McCleod, “Impact Moderato” (Free Music Archive)

Hyson, “Traces” (Free Music Archive)

Hefferman, “Discovery” (Free Music Archive)

Hefferman, “Winter Trek” (Free Music Archive)

The Bell, “I Am History” (Free Music Archive)

Production Credits

Executive Producer: Lulu Spencer

Technical Advisors: Holly Hunt and Jesse Anderson

Podcasting Consultant: Darrell Darnell of Pro Podcast Solutions

Photographer: John Buckingham

Graphic Designer: Maggie Cellucci

Website by: ERI Design