Tag Archives: #Slavery

mass incarceration

Episode 022 The History of Mass Incarceration in the US, Part 2


Why are so many Americans in prison? Right now, there are 2.3 million Americans held in US prisons. That’s a HUGE number, relative to the overall US population. The US makes up just 5% of the world’s population, but we hold 25% of the world’s prison population. Put another way, 1 in 4 people held in prison around the world is an American citizen. And a disproportionate number of these inmates are people of color, mostly African American and Latino. Furthermore, this phenomenon of mass incarceration is a relatively recent one. In 1970 the incarceration rate in the US was roughly 150 people per 100,000. In 2017 it’s well over 700 people per 100,000! How did we get here? What happened around 1970 that sent us down this path?
To answer these questions, I speak with historian Elizabeth Hinton, author of the book, From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America (Harvard University Press). She’ll help us see the key public policy decisions regarding crime and criminal justice — and the assumptions about race and poverty that shaped them — that caused the US prison population to explode after 1970.

Elizabeth Hinton, From the War on Poverty to the War on CrimeAbout Elizabeth Hinton

website

Further Reading

Elizabeth Hinton, From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America (Harvard University Press)

Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness (2010)

Todd R. Clear and Natasha A. Frost, The Punishment Imperative: The Rise and Failure of Mass Incarceration in America (2013)

Jonathan Simon, Mass Incarceration on Trial: A Remarkable Court Decision and the Future of Prisons in America (2014)

Carimah Townes, “The True Cost of Mass Incarceration Exceeds $1 Trillion,” Sept 12, 2016 www.ThinkProgress.org

Peter Wagner and Bernadette Rabuy, “Mass Incarceration: The Whole Pie 2016,” March 14, 2016 www.PrisonPolicy.org

Michelle Ye Hee Lee, “Yes, U.S. locks people up at a higher rate than any other country,” Washington Post, July 7, 2015

mass incarceration graphMusic for this Episode

Jay Graham, ITPL Intro (JayGMusic.com)

Kevin McCleod, “Impact Moderato” (Free Music Archive)

The Womb, “I Hope It Hurts” (Free Music Archive)

Hyson, Signals (Free Music Archive)

Philipp Weigl, “Even When We Fall” (Free Music Archive)

The Bell, “I Am History” (Free Music Archive)

Production Credits

Executive Producer: Lulu Spencer

Associate Producer, Devyn McHugh

Technical Advisors: Holly Hunt and Jesse Anderson

Podcasting Consultant: Darrell Darnell of Pro Podcast Solutions

Photographer: John Buckingham

Graphic Designer: Maggie Cellucci

Website by: ERI Design

Legal services: Tippecanoe and Tyler Too

Social Media management: The Pony Express

Risk Assessment: Little Big Horn Associates

Growth strategies: 54 40 or Fight

Snoring Beagle International, Ltd

Mercy Street Rewind - MansionHouse_LOC - title card

Mercy Street Rewind with Megan Kate Nelson – We Review Each Episode from Season 2

subscribe-buttonMercy Street Rewind is a special feature of In the Past Lane, the podcast about history and why it matters. Historian Megan Kate Nelson (Senior Civil War Correspondent for ITPL) sits down with Edward T. O’Donnell (Historian-at-Large and host of ITPL) to break down each episode of the PBS historical drama, “Mercy Street.” We offer insightful and often humorous analysis of the show, its characters, and the stories it tells — all from the perspective of historians, with Megan’s sharp cultural critic analysis as an added plus. Spoiler alert: we recommend you watch each episode before listening to our take.
Scroll down to find each episode. [Looking for Season 1 episodes? Click here]

Mercy Street Rewind, Season 2 Extra – a conversation with co-creator David Zabel

Mercy Street Rewind, Season 2, Episode 1: “A Balm in Gilead”

Mercy Street Rewind, Season 2, Episode 2: “The House Guest”

Mercy Street Rewind, Season 2, Episode 3: “One Equal Temper”

Mercy Street Rewind, Season 2, Episode 4: “Southern Mercy”

Mercy Street Rewind, Season 2, Episode 5: “Unknown Soldier”

Mercy Street Rewind, Season 2, Episode 6: “House of Bondage”

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Episode 20 African American Soldiers in the Civil War


In this episode of ITPL, we focus on the experiences of African Americans who joined the Union Army during the Civil War and the profound impact they had on the war’s final outcome — and on American society in the decades that followed. There’s a lot more to this story than what you may have seen in the award-winning film, “Glory” (1989). So here’s the lineup:
1. First, I provide a brief backgrounder on the basic details regarding African Americans and their service in the Union Army and Navy.
2. Second, I sit down with historian Douglas Egerton to talk about his new book, Thunder at the Gates: The Black Civil War Regiments That Redeemed America (Basic Books, 2016).
3. Finally, I present a feature on the Ft. Pillow Massacre, perhaps the grimmest incident in the whole Civil War.
In The Past Lane is a production of Snoring Beagle International, Ltd.

Show notes for this episode

More About Douglas Egertonitpl-020-egerton-book-cover

His faculty page at LeMoyne College

Further Reading and Links

Douglas Egerton, Thunder at the Gates: The Black Civil War Regiments That Redeemed America (Basic Books, 2016)

Martin H. Blatt, ed., et al, Hope & Glory: Essays on the Legacy of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment (2000)

James Henry Gooding, On the Altar of Freedom: A Black Soldier’s Civil War Letters from the Front

James M. McPherson, The Negro’s Civil War: How American Blacks Felt and Acted During the War for the Union

Episode Credits

Music

Jay Graham, ITPL Intro (courtesy, JayGMusic.com)

Kevin McCleod, “Impact Moderato” (Free Music Archive)

Kevin McLeod, Impact Moderato (Free Music Archive)

Andy Cohen, “Bathed in Fine Dust” (Free Music Archive)

Ketsa, “Escape the Profane” (Free Music Archive)

Jason Shaw, “Acoustic Meditation” (Free Music Archive)

Cuicuitte, “Vivan” and “Sultan Cintre” (Free Music Archive)

Dana Boule, “We All Need to Calm Down” (Free Music Archive)

The Bell, “I Am History” (Free Music Archive)

Hyson, “Signals” (Free Music Archive)

The Bell, “I Am History” (Free Music Archive)

Production

Technical Advisors: Holly Hunt and Jesse Anderson

Podcasting Consultant: Darrell Darnell of Pro Podcast Solutions

Photographer: John Buckingham

Graphic Designer: Maggie Cellucci

Website by: ERI Design

Legal services: Tippecanoe and Tyler Too

Social Media management: the Pony Express

Risk Assessment: Little Big Horn associates

Growth strategies: 54 40 or Fight

Snoring Beagle International, Ltd

 

 

Mercy Street Rewind - MansionHouse_LOC - title card

Mercy Street Rewind with Megan Kate Nelson – We Review Each Episode from Season 1

subscribe-buttonMercy Street Rewind is a special feature of In the Past Lane, the podcast about history and why it matters. Historian Megan Kate Nelson (Senior Civil War Correspondent for ITPL) sits down with Edward T. O’Donnell (Historian-at-Large and host of ITPL) to break down each episode of the PBS historical drama, “Mercy Street.” We offer insightful and often humorous analysis of the show, its characters, and the stories it tells — all from the perspective of historians, with Megan’s sharp cultural critic analysis as an added plus. Spoiler alert: we recommend you watch each episode before listening to our take.
Scroll down to find each episode. [Looking for Season 2 episodes? Click here]

Mercy Street Rewind Season 1, Episode 1

Mercy Street Rewind Season 1, Episode 2

subscribe-button

 

Mercy Street Rewind Season 1, Episode 3

Mercy Street Rewind Season 1, Episode 4

Mercy Street Rewind Season 1, Episode 5

Mercy Street Rewind Season 1, Episode 6

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Episode 019 The Hidden History of Indian Slavery in America


This week at ITPL, I speak with historian Andres Resendez about his new book, The Other Slavery: The Uncovered History of Indian Slavery in America. The enslaving of native peoples in the Americas began the moment Christopher Columbus arrived. And it was no smasubscribe-buttonll venture. Some 2.5 – 5 million Indians were enslaved (compared to approximately 12 million Africans). In my interview with Professor Resendez, he explains how and why this system of exploitation started and why it somehow remained hidden, both at the time and later in the historical record. This recovery of the story of Indian slavery has major implications for the understanding of not just the history of American slavery, but for all of American history.

More about Andres Resendez:
http://history.ucdavis.edu/people/resendezep-019-resendez-other-slavery-cover-image-copy

This and That
The PBS documentary about Pearl Harbor I’m featured in:  Pearl Harbor: The USS Oklahoma: The Final Story

Further Reading:

Andres Resendez, The Other Slavery: The Uncovered History of Indian Slavery in America

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States

Brendan C. Lindsay, Murder State: California’s Native American Genocide, 1846-1873

Benjamin Madley, An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846-1873

David E. Stannard, American Holocaust: The Conquest of the New World

Music

Jay Graham, ITPL Intro (courtesy, JayGMusic.com)

Kevin McCleod, “Impact Moderato” (Free Music Archive)

Lee Rosevere, “Going Home” (Free Music Archive)

The Bell, “On The Street” (Free Music Archive)

Jason Shaw, “River Meditation” (Free Music Archive)

The Bell, “I Am History” (Free Music Archive)